THE HISTORY OF TIES THE HISTORY OF TIES

Posted by Galleria Brands

They are worn at weddings, and funerals. They are worn in the boardroom, and the ballroom. They are commonly found in church, and business lunches. They are worn at the car dealership and the Oval Office. Few things can be found in such a wide array of places, but the modern-day necktie is one of them. The tie has a rich and varied history that spans from soldiers to royalty, and doesn’t appear to be going anywhere any time soon. From ancient warriors, Croatian soldiers, royal courts, and blue-collar workers, the necktie demonstrates a willingness to evolve with the times, while maintaining a connection to our past.

A version of the tie was seen as early as 221 BC when the first Emperor of China, Shih Huan Ti, was buried with his terra cotta army. It was expected that when the Emperor died, the members of his court (including his army) would be killed as well, so that they could accompany their ruler in the afterlife. The Emperor’s advisors convinced him to bury an army of statues with him instead. These statues featured a wrapped neck cloth that resembled what we know today as a tie. However, there is nothing historical that indicates that this was common in that era. Instead, most historians agree that the cloth was a badge of honor bestowed among the Emperors army.

During the Thirty Years War, Croatian soldiers loyal to France were presented to King Louis XIII. He was enamored with their neckties, which were used to tie the nape of their shirts shut. King Louis XIII preferred them over the stiff ruffles that were common to court at that time. The bright colors, fine fabrics, and simple knots not only attracted his eye, but soon French courts were full of them. The French took them to the next level, using muslin, silk, lace and taffeta. These ties came to be known as cravats, and soon worked their way around Europe. The lace cravat was made popular by King Louis XIV, who started wearing them at the tender age of seven.

During the seventeenth century cravats spread to the American colonies, and became popular with men of all stations, not just the aristocrats. The cravat was worn every day, and came in a wide variety of fabrics, colors, and styles. Books like The Neckclothitania and The Art of Tying the Cravat were dedicated to the art. The more complicated the tie, the more it spoke to the man’s standing and wealth. During this time, it also became more commonly referred to as the “tie.”

When the Industrial Revolution hit, it changed the future of fashion, specifically for ties. Cravats took a long time to tie, they were complex, and ornate. Men needed a style that was simpler, that wouldn’t take a lot of time and skill to wear. These were men that were working in factories, they were white collar workers. Their hours were long, and their days were hard. The tie was important to their appearance. At this point it was a social norm, and men of all stations were expected to wear a tie. During this period ties became longer, and narrower to accommodate the need for simplicity. The “new” necktie was tied four-in-hand, which is a knot that has withstood the test of time and continues to be a popular choice today.

During the late 1800s to the early 1900s ties began to change. Different institutions began to use the ties to denote affiliations within their groups. Varying styles became more popular. The bow-tie became more popular, which was similar to the cravat but smaller. The bolo tie also became more popular, a style choice that is commonly found in the west. These were popular with cowboys, and today are the state tie of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Prior to this point, the longer version of the tie was not that long. Men typically wore their pants around their natural waist, around the belly button, and wore long cloaks that usually concealed the bottom of the tie. As styles changed, ties became longer, as men started wearing their trousers around their hips.

A history of ties would not be complete without mentioning the ascot, which was made popular by King Edward VII. He typically wore it to horse races, which is where they derived the name. The Royal Ascot is one of the most celebrated racing events in England. These became the standard for formal dinners, horse races, and are still considered a suitable choice for morning dress wear.

Ties once again changed drastically in the 1920s. A New York tie maker, Jessie Langsdorf, innovated a new way to cut ties, in three pieces, which allowed the ties to hang flat once tied. Also during this time, Richard Atkinson and Company developed the slipstitch. This allowed tie manufacturers to assemble the ties in a manner which secured the lining and interlining once assembled. From this point on, ties would continue to wildly vary in length, width, and color, but the overall style would generally stay the same.

In the 1940s ties were wide, and consisted of wild prints and designs. Art Deco was a popular choice during this era. From the 1950s through the 1960s ties became slimmer and longer, and the designs became much more subdued with a heavy emphasis on more solid colors. The Kipper tie, a more triangular shape, was introduced in the later 1960s and was popular into the 1970s, along with bolder prints. Though ties were wider in the 1970s, in the 1980s they became narrower again. Throughout this period designers were experimenting with bold colors and designs. From the late 1980s through the 1990s pop culture novelty ties became all the rage and were quite common.

Styles continue to change, and the tie continues to evolve. Though they are becoming less prevalent in the business world with the number of millennial operated companies, they will continue to hold a place in our society. We have seen the styles go from wide and colorful, complex and detailed, to narrow and demur, and they will continue to change with the times. Ties will never lose their place in our society, because for many people they represent our history, ties to our past, and a rich heritage. From the boardroom to the ballroom, ties will continue to hold an essential place in the world of men’s fashion.

They are worn at weddings, and funerals. They are worn in the boardroom, and the ballroom. They are commonly found in church, and business lunches. They are worn at the car dealership and the Oval Office. Few things can be found in such a wide array of places, but the modern-day necktie is one of them. The tie has a rich and varied history that spans from soldiers to royalty, and doesn’t appear to be going anywhere any time soon. From ancient warriors, Croatian soldiers, royal courts, and blue-collar workers, the necktie demonstrates a willingness to evolve with the times, while maintaining a connection to our past.

A version of the tie was seen as early as 221 BC when the first Emperor of China, Shih Huan Ti, was buried with his terra cotta army. It was expected that when the Emperor died, the members of his court (including his army) would be killed as well, so that they could accompany their ruler in the afterlife. The Emperor’s advisors convinced him to bury an army of statues with him instead. These statues featured a wrapped neck cloth that resembled what we know today as a tie. However, there is nothing historical that indicates that this was common in that era. Instead, most historians agree that the cloth was a badge of honor bestowed among the Emperors army.

During the Thirty Years War, Croatian soldiers loyal to France were presented to King Louis XIII. He was enamored with their neckties, which were used to tie the nape of their shirts shut. King Louis XIII preferred them over the stiff ruffles that were common to court at that time. The bright colors, fine fabrics, and simple knots not only attracted his eye, but soon French courts were full of them. The French took them to the next level, using muslin, silk, lace and taffeta. These ties came to be known as cravats, and soon worked their way around Europe. The lace cravat was made popular by King Louis XIV, who started wearing them at the tender age of seven.

During the seventeenth century cravats spread to the American colonies, and became popular with men of all stations, not just the aristocrats. The cravat was worn every day, and came in a wide variety of fabrics, colors, and styles. Books like The Neckclothitania and The Art of Tying the Cravat were dedicated to the art. The more complicated the tie, the more it spoke to the man’s standing and wealth. During this time, it also became more commonly referred to as the “tie.”

When the Industrial Revolution hit, it changed the future of fashion, specifically for ties. Cravats took a long time to tie, they were complex, and ornate. Men needed a style that was simpler, that wouldn’t take a lot of time and skill to wear. These were men that were working in factories, they were white collar workers. Their hours were long, and their days were hard. The tie was important to their appearance. At this point it was a social norm, and men of all stations were expected to wear a tie. During this period ties became longer, and narrower to accommodate the need for simplicity. The “new” necktie was tied four-in-hand, which is a knot that has withstood the test of time and continues to be a popular choice today.

During the late 1800s to the early 1900s ties began to change. Different institutions began to use the ties to denote affiliations within their groups. Varying styles became more popular. The bow-tie became more popular, which was similar to the cravat but smaller. The bolo tie also became more popular, a style choice that is commonly found in the west. These were popular with cowboys, and today are the state tie of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Prior to this point, the longer version of the tie was not that long. Men typically wore their pants around their natural waist, around the belly button, and wore long cloaks that usually concealed the bottom of the tie. As styles changed, ties became longer, as men started wearing their trousers around their hips.

A history of ties would not be complete without mentioning the ascot, which was made popular by King Edward VII. He typically wore it to horse races, which is where they derived the name. The Royal Ascot is one of the most celebrated racing events in England. These became the standard for formal dinners, horse races, and are still considered a suitable choice for morning dress wear.

Ties once again changed drastically in the 1920s. A New York tie maker, Jessie Langsdorf, innovated a new way to cut ties, in three pieces, which allowed the ties to hang flat once tied. Also during this time, Richard Atkinson and Company developed the slipstitch. This allowed tie manufacturers to assemble the ties in a manner which secured the lining and interlining once assembled. From this point on, ties would continue to wildly vary in length, width, and color, but the overall style would generally stay the same.

In the 1940s ties were wide, and consisted of wild prints and designs. Art Deco was a popular choice during this era. From the 1950s through the 1960s ties became slimmer and longer, and the designs became much more subdued with a heavy emphasis on more solid colors. The Kipper tie, a more triangular shape, was introduced in the later 1960s and was popular into the 1970s, along with bolder prints. Though ties were wider in the 1970s, in the 1980s they became narrower again. Throughout this period designers were experimenting with bold colors and designs. From the late 1980s through the 1990s pop culture novelty ties became all the rage and were quite common.

Styles continue to change, and the tie continues to evolve. Though they are becoming less prevalent in the business world with the number of millennial operated companies, they will continue to hold a place in our society. We have seen the styles go from wide and colorful, complex and detailed, to narrow and demur, and they will continue to change with the times. Ties will never lose their place in our society, because for many people they represent our history, ties to our past, and a rich heritage. From the boardroom to the ballroom, ties will continue to hold an essential place in the world of men’s fashion.