TYING THE KNOT (…BUT NOT LIKE THAT): THE SIMPLE ART OF TYING A NECK TIE TYING THE KNOT (…BUT NOT LIKE THAT): THE SIMPLE ART OF TYING A NECK TIE

Posted by Galleria Brands

If you’re trying to make a statement, chances are it’s not necessarily in what you’re saying, but instead within the smallest of details. Which is why, when it comes to men’s fashion, it’s important to understand what subliminal messages your wardrobe choices are sending out to the world. It’s better if you rule your choices instead of having your choices rule you.

If you’re looking to signify power, trust in a business relationship, a sense of style or even a subconscious signal of approachability, the way you knot your tie can be one way—even though it can be one of the smallest of details—to get your message across.

The styles that are out there in ways that men can tie their ties can range from the Four In Hand to the Half Windsor knot. Each of these hark to their own moments in history. There is always the option, too, of considering a bow tie—depending on your type of style and your attire for the occasion—but each of these manners of tying a tie portrays a different sort of method. Each of these knots suits different shirt collars and the size of the neck of a man.

It’s altogether possible that one knot may fit your proportions better than another one. Play around and see which you prefer best.

Give these four classic necktie knots a go and see which one most speaks to your face shape and the message you are trying to get across.

Before you’re ready to loop-de-loop the necktie hanging from your neck, make sure these things are all taken care of first.

Secure the top most button on your shirt and flip your collar up. This makes it easier for you to place the necktie around your collar with the wide end of the tie on your right and the thin end on the left hand side with the seams facing down.

Next, pull the wide end down so it hangs around your thigh. This may take some initial adjustments to get the correct length depending on your height, the length, and the certain type of fabric of your tie.

 

  1. The Four In Hand Tie Knot

 

This knot may be one of the oldest ties in the book. Originally, people believe it stems from when British horseman were tying their scarves—one-handed—while they were holding the reigns of four horses in the other hand. Now, these days, you may have a razor in one hand or your other hand full of pomade fixing your hair, but it is altogether possible to fix this knot one-handed. If you’re truly looking to start with the basics, the Four In Hand knot is one of the easiest knots on the planet to learn.

For tall men, the Four in Hand knot is a good call. This way of tying requires less of the tie’s length, so even tall men can use a regular length tie and make it work.

This common and easy-to-tie knot creates a small and uneven knot that is perfect for narrow spread collars and for the button down collared dress shirts that may be worn in the everyday circumstances.

 

  1. The Half Windsor Knot

 

If you still feel as though you are man who is a bit of a novice, consider the Half Windsor as another easy pal to learn with. This knot is perfect for medium-width and thick ties and is quite versatile. Like the Four In Hand knot, the Half Windsor is another choice pick for big and tall men who are trying to wear a tie that measures in at regular tie length.

This common knot is not quite as easy (but still do-able!) and creates a finished product that contains a medium and even sized knot.

 

  1. The Full Windsor Tie Knot

 

Ah. The Full Windsor. In case you haven’t been paying attention over the years, this is the knot that nearly every President of the United States wears. It speaks of power. It speaks of confidence. It speaks of authority. It harks back to its early beginnings in the royal heritage of the English. Even then this knot spoke volumes and assured a certain aura of prestige. The Windsor is a well-known power knot for business and, once tied, creates a very large symmetrical and triangular shaped knot.

The Full Windsor knot goes best with longer and wider ties. Because this knot requires the two wrappings, additional tie length is required and non-negotiable. Men who are taller and who have wider necks will need a tie that measure between 61 and 64 inches.

When finally pulling the wide end all the way down, it is important to smooth out any creases or slack within the knot. It will be easy to adjust the tie by holding the knot with a thumb and forefinger while pulling on the slim end with your other hand.

 

  1. Bow Ties

 

Another easy one for the books! Don’t be afraid of bow ties. Chances are if you can tie your own shoe laces, you can easily learn how to knot together a bow tie into a semblance of fashion.

A black bow tie is a certain symbol of formality and may be most suited for a black-tie or formal event, but depending on the event and depending on your sense of style meter (are you a daredevil in the field of fashion or do you prefer to play it safe?), choices for bow ties are endless.

The knot is so easy that it’s best to avoid the clip-on versions if at all possible.

When beginning the bow tie knot, start by having one end of the bow tie longer than the other by a few inches. The longer end should fall on your right side.

As you continue through the bow tie choreography and once you finish with the wings in place, tug the loops behind the wings to tighten the vertical front knot.

If you’re trying to make a statement, chances are it’s not necessarily in what you’re saying, but instead within the smallest of details. Which is why, when it comes to men’s fashion, it’s important to understand what subliminal messages your wardrobe choices are sending out to the world. It’s better if you rule your choices instead of having your choices rule you.

If you’re looking to signify power, trust in a business relationship, a sense of style or even a subconscious signal of approachability, the way you knot your tie can be one way—even though it can be one of the smallest of details—to get your message across.

The styles that are out there in ways that men can tie their ties can range from the Four In Hand to the Half Windsor knot. Each of these hark to their own moments in history. There is always the option, too, of considering a bow tie—depending on your type of style and your attire for the occasion—but each of these manners of tying a tie portrays a different sort of method. Each of these knots suits different shirt collars and the size of the neck of a man.

It’s altogether possible that one knot may fit your proportions better than another one. Play around and see which you prefer best.

Give these four classic necktie knots a go and see which one most speaks to your face shape and the message you are trying to get across.

Before you’re ready to loop-de-loop the necktie hanging from your neck, make sure these things are all taken care of first.

Secure the top most button on your shirt and flip your collar up. This makes it easier for you to place the necktie around your collar with the wide end of the tie on your right and the thin end on the left hand side with the seams facing down.

Next, pull the wide end down so it hangs around your thigh. This may take some initial adjustments to get the correct length depending on your height, the length, and the certain type of fabric of your tie.

 

  1. The Four In Hand Tie Knot

 

This knot may be one of the oldest ties in the book. Originally, people believe it stems from when British horseman were tying their scarves—one-handed—while they were holding the reigns of four horses in the other hand. Now, these days, you may have a razor in one hand or your other hand full of pomade fixing your hair, but it is altogether possible to fix this knot one-handed. If you’re truly looking to start with the basics, the Four In Hand knot is one of the easiest knots on the planet to learn.

For tall men, the Four in Hand knot is a good call. This way of tying requires less of the tie’s length, so even tall men can use a regular length tie and make it work.

This common and easy-to-tie knot creates a small and uneven knot that is perfect for narrow spread collars and for the button down collared dress shirts that may be worn in the everyday circumstances.

 

  1. The Half Windsor Knot

 

If you still feel as though you are man who is a bit of a novice, consider the Half Windsor as another easy pal to learn with. This knot is perfect for medium-width and thick ties and is quite versatile. Like the Four In Hand knot, the Half Windsor is another choice pick for big and tall men who are trying to wear a tie that measures in at regular tie length.

This common knot is not quite as easy (but still do-able!) and creates a finished product that contains a medium and even sized knot.

 

  1. The Full Windsor Tie Knot

 

Ah. The Full Windsor. In case you haven’t been paying attention over the years, this is the knot that nearly every President of the United States wears. It speaks of power. It speaks of confidence. It speaks of authority. It harks back to its early beginnings in the royal heritage of the English. Even then this knot spoke volumes and assured a certain aura of prestige. The Windsor is a well-known power knot for business and, once tied, creates a very large symmetrical and triangular shaped knot.

The Full Windsor knot goes best with longer and wider ties. Because this knot requires the two wrappings, additional tie length is required and non-negotiable. Men who are taller and who have wider necks will need a tie that measure between 61 and 64 inches.

When finally pulling the wide end all the way down, it is important to smooth out any creases or slack within the knot. It will be easy to adjust the tie by holding the knot with a thumb and forefinger while pulling on the slim end with your other hand.

 

  1. Bow Ties

 

Another easy one for the books! Don’t be afraid of bow ties. Chances are if you can tie your own shoe laces, you can easily learn how to knot together a bow tie into a semblance of fashion.

A black bow tie is a certain symbol of formality and may be most suited for a black-tie or formal event, but depending on the event and depending on your sense of style meter (are you a daredevil in the field of fashion or do you prefer to play it safe?), choices for bow ties are endless.

The knot is so easy that it’s best to avoid the clip-on versions if at all possible.

When beginning the bow tie knot, start by having one end of the bow tie longer than the other by a few inches. The longer end should fall on your right side.

As you continue through the bow tie choreography and once you finish with the wings in place, tug the loops behind the wings to tighten the vertical front knot.